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Welcome to Dames of Dialogue, Jeffrey. Tell us one strange and provocative tidbit from your life that nobody has heard before.

They say that everyone in the world has a double, an exact lookalike. I was surprised to find a few years ago that mine is a celebrity. I’m mistaken internationally for Steve Wozniak, the computer guy Jeffrey McQuain Author Image (2)who cofounded Apple and then performed on “Dancing With the Stars.” When I try to explain politely that I’m not “the Woz,” as he’s nicknamed, people don’t believe me or look disappointed to learn the truth that I can’t dance or build computers. If my novel “The Shakespeare Conspiracy” succeeds, though, I’m hoping somebody somewhere asks the Woz, “Aren’t you the guy who writes those Shakespeare thrillers?”

Tell us about your latest book.

I’m very excited about my first novel. It’s a thriller based on the Bard’s racial background. The main character, Professor Christopher Klewe, teaches Shakespeare at William and Mary in Virginia. When his best friend is murdered by a secret society in Washington, he has only three days to outrun killers on two continents and reveal the biggest conspiracy in literary history. Much in the style of Dan Brown’s “Da Vinci Code,” my novel uses fast pacing and cliffhangers to move the story along and to allow readers a whole new way to see Shakespeare.

Can you share a little bit about what you’re working on now or what’s coming next?

My next novel in the Christopher Klewe series is a prequel to the first one and will be titled “The Shakespeare Trap.” It shows how Klewe became caught up in solving Shakespeare mysteries as he tracks a serial killer who leaves clues from the Bard’s tragedies. This second novel takes place in Williamsburg, Virginia, and it should be ready later this year.

When you’re writing, who’s in control, you or the characters?

I hate to say it, but I think novelists tend to be control freaks. We invent the world and the characters, often forcing them to do what we want. That being said, there are moments that the characters rebel against all my good intentions. In “The Shakespeare Conspiracy,” for example, one character was originally meant to die, but she was too important to let go, so she was granted a reprieve in my final rewrite.  Now here’s the strange part: when the characters do take control, the writing becomes an almost out-of-body experience for me, and that’s my favorite part of being a novelist. In other words, sometimes I’m driving the bus, and sometimes I’m just along for the ride.

Who are your favorite authors, the ones you read when you should be doing something else? Why do they appeal to you?

My favorite writer is Shakespeare, of course, but I find that my preferred modern writers are mostly women, particularly in the mystery genre. I think that women tend to be more detailoriented and make scenes come to live more vividly. Among mystery writers, I read everyone from Agatha Christie (the best at plotting) to Martha Grimes (the best at characterization). Try any Grimes novel about Detective Richard Jury, but I especially recommend her Shakespeare story, “The Dirty Duck.”

Mark Twain said, “Southerners speak music…” Do you have a favorite southern saying you can share with our readers?

I tend to travel around the South a lot, and I’m always hearing lines that I want to save. My latest nonfiction book is “Ebony Swan,” which makes me think of the favorite Southern euphemism, “I swan” (meaning “I swear”). I’ve also heard “I could use a skinny nap,” as well as the greeting when two women met on the street: “If I’d known you’d be here,” announced the one with a grin, “I’d have brought my gun.” I also love Southern signs. There’s a bar in Daytona Beach, for instance, across from the town cemetery. The sign says, “Order a drink and have a seat. You’re better off here than across the street.”

Where do you find inspiration for your writing?

I started thinking about a mystery/thriller series while reading and teaching Shakespeare. My inspirations come from everywhere, though, and I have to keep paper and pen nearby at all times. In fact, even my dreams can contribute. One night I was dreaming about being chased through a library, and I soon started writing “The Shakespeare Conspiracy.”  Of course, one drawback is that I can’t control when an idea strikes. I may be in conversation with you when my eyes glaze over with thoughts for a fictional murder, but I promise it’s not personal.

If you could talk for thirty minutes with any author (or person), living or dead, who would it be?

jmcquain.theshakespeareconspiracyI don’t know what I’d ask Shakespeare, so I suppose I’d talk with my favorite modern writer, the novelist Shirley Jackson. She’s the only writer I know who can frighten me with one story and have me laughing uproariously at another. I wrote a graduate thesis about her work and was allowed to use her personal papers at the Library of Congress. It was a thrill to see her unpublished letters and find a four-leaf  clover pressed in her childhood diary. She died in 1965, so I’ll never get to ask her about the secrets to her multifaceted writing, but she was my biggest inspiration to become a writer.

Were books an important part of your household when you were growing up?

Yes, books were always important in my house. My mother worked outside the house as a library aide, so she was always telling me about books she enjoyed. My father worked for NASA as a meteorologist, and I remember that he would sit down in the evenings to smoke a pipe and read a dictionary he kept beside the chair. I have one brother, Dan, who is older and the most prodigious reader I’ve ever met, so I had to learn to read early just to keep up with him.

Any teachers who influenced you…encouraged you or discouraged?

I had a drama teacher named Marguerite Coley when I was in high school. She was exceptionally good at encouraging students not to worry about limitations.

I even tried acting for a while as a result of her courses, but soon I turned to writing as my creative release. Years later, when I started teaching, I remembered many of her acting lessons to use in teaching Shakespeare classes across the country.

 Any good suggestions for overcoming writer’s block?

The best secret I can share is not to force it. Turn your attention to other things. Daydream a little. Brush up your Shakespeare. Often I have an inspiration about another way to approach a scene. It helps also to keep more than one project going at a time. That way, when I’m blocked on one, I can usually make progress on something else. Finally, I’d heard that Ernest Hemingway would stop working midsentence at the end of his day, so he’d know where to pick up the next day. (To be fair, though, I’ve tried this system and found I had no idea where I was going with that sentence.)

Any books on writing you have found most helpful? Or classes you’ve taken?

The mystery writer Martha Grimes once taught at a Maryland community college I attended, but I regret never taking her class. Instead, I’ve read the writing lectures by Shirley Jackson and I recommend them as well as the Strunk and White classic “Elements of English.” I also wrote a book on writing called “Power Language,” in which I advised writers to inject humor whenever it’s appropriate.

The truth, though, is that writing is an organic process that uses everything you’ve ever seen or done. You must take those experiences and craft them into a finished product. That’s why I’m excited about my first novel, “The Shakespeare Conspiracy,” and I’ve found I’m enjoying myself writing fiction more and more. I’m already plotting the third novel in the series and thinking of other projects, including a stage play of my nonfiction book “Ebony Swan: The Case for Shakespeare’s Race”.

Welcome to Dames of Dialogue, Amy. Tell us about your latest book.

Down a country road not far from Charleston, South Carolina, stands an antebellum plantation as old as the oaks arching their leafy limbs over the long drive leading to the great house. Known as Peppernell Manor, the home has seen better days.

Cora Camille Chadwick-Peppernell, the matriarch of the Peppernell family, has finally decided to have her home amy readerestored. She offers the job to Carleigh Warner, an old college friend of her granddaughter, Evie. Carleigh, a restoration specialist living and working in Chicago, jumps at the chance to relocate, at least temporarily, to South Carolina and restore the old manor, which she fondly remembers visiting during her college days. With permission from her ex-husband, she takes her young daughter, Lucy, with her to the sultry South.

Once Carleigh arrives at the old manor, it doesn’t take her long to learn that not everyone in the Peppernell family is happy about the direction the restoration is taking. There are certain family members who would like to see the plantation under the management of a firm that would turn the property into a tourist destination. As disagreements begin to take a menacing turn under the hanging Spanish moss and violence visits the manor, Carleigh must choose whether to stay in South Carolina or leave it all behind for her own safety and that of her little girl.

The Ghosts of Peppernell Manor was released on April 28th.  It is not a ghost story. There are a couple characters who believe in ghosts, but the ghosts in the story are metaphorical, not real.

Can you share a little bit about what you’re working on now or what’s coming next?

Just last week I sent my publisher the full manuscript for my next novel, which is due out in March, 2016. It doesn’t even have an official title yet. For now, its working title is The House of Hanging Jade, but I fully expect that to change.

It’s the story of a young sous chef in Washington, D.C., Kailani Kanaka, who returns to her native Hawaii to take a job as the personal chef to a family living on the island of Hawaii, often called the Big Island.

Kailani is soon called on to deal with more than the job description called for, with a family in desperate turmoil and an unexpected and unwanted visitor from her past. Before long the secrets and the tensions in the home begin to build and Kailani must find the courage to stay and follow her heart.

When you’re writing, who’s in control, you or the characters?

I am in control when I write. I’m not the kind of writer that can sit down and let the characters take over, though sometimes I wish I were. Before I write anything I have an outline of exactly where I want to go with the story and what situations the characters will find themselves in.

Who are your favorite authors, the ones you read when you should be doing something else? Why do they appeal to you?

There are lots of writers I love, but probably my favorite (at least today) is M.C. Beaton. She writes the Agatha Raisin series and the Hamish Macbeth series, and I just can’t get enough of them. The Agatha Raisin books are set in the Cotswolds and the Hamish Macbeth books are set in the Scottish Highlands. I love the books for their humor, their quirky characters, their settings, and their mysteries.

I also enjoy reading anything by Ernest Hemingway or Jane Austen. And I’m currently working on two books: Senseless Acts of Beauty by Lisa Verge Higgins and The One You Love by Paul Pilkington.

Promotion is a big—and usually the most hated—part of being a writer. Can you share a little bit about how you promote?

I actually like to promote, but I do wish it didn’t take so much time and I wish the results were instantaneous. I promote on social media, on my blog, on my website, on other blogs, in person (at book signings, conferences, and library talks), in newspapers, on online radio, and in magazines, both online and print.

Promotion takes away from the time I have to actually write, but I’m thankful to have that problem.

What do you consider the single most satisfying aspect of being a writer?

amy reade bookDefinitely all the people I’ve met, both writers and readers. There’s nothing nicer than opening my email and finding a message from a reader who enjoyed my books. I am so grateful for all my readers, but especially the ones who reach out to me like that.

And as for writers, the ones I’ve met are an absolutely wonderful group of people. They’re supportive, encouraging, kind, and gracious. I couldn’t ask for a better group of colleagues.

Who were your favorite authors as a child? Have they influenced your writing career in any way?

I read voraciously as a child. Probably my favorite “author” when I was young wasn’t a single author at all, but Carolyn Keene, the group of authors who wrote the Nancy Drew mysteries. One of my favorite books was Down, Down the Mountain by Ellis Credle. And when I was older, I read every word by James Herriott that I could find.

If you could talk for thirty minutes with any author (or person), living or dead, who would it be?

I’d talk to my grandmother. She died several years ago and there are lots of questions I would ask her about her childhood that only she can answer.

What are your thoughts on the standard writing advice, “write what you know”?

I once wrote a blog post about that question. I followed the advice and wrote what I knew for my first book, Secrets of Hallstead House, which was set in the Thousand Islands region of northern New York, but I also wrote what I wanted to know. The main character was a nurse and I didn’t know enough about nursing to write thoroughly about it, so I did quite a lot of research on nursing for that book. For The Ghosts of Peppernell Manor, I researched endlessly the decorating and restoration of Civil War-era plantation houses. I didn’t know anything about those topics when I started planning the book.

How do you classify yourself as a writer? Fiction or non-fiction? Specific genre such as mystery, short story, paranormal or more general such as women’s fiction, Appalachian, etc.

I classify myself as a fiction writer. Under the fiction umbrella I consider myself a writer of women’s fiction with a romantic suspense bent.

Have you bought an e-reader? What is your overall impression of electronic publishing?      

I have a Kindle that I love. I know a lot of people prefer books they can hold in their hands, but e-readers definitely have some advantages over books. First, I can increase the font if I want to. Second, instead of taking a heavy pile of books when I go somewhere, I can put them on my Kindle and have everything on one device at my fingertips. And third, ebooks are very often cheaper than both hardcover and paperback books.  Yes, there’s the smell of books and the feeling of pages under your fingertips, and I love paper books, too, but I can’t say that I prefer them to e-readers.

Any books on writing you have found most helpful? Or classes you’ve taken?

The book I’ve found most helpful, the book that is never far from my desk, the book that I have highlighted and dog-eared to death, is Phyllis Whitney’s Guide to Fiction Writing. It takes an aspiring writer step-by-step through the practical and organizational processes she recommends to produce a finished novel. I know her methods aren’t for everyone (there are lots of writers, called “pantsters,” who write without outlines and reams of notes), but they work very well for me.

P.S. Thank you so much for hosting this interview on Dames of Dialogue. It’s been a wonderful experience and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.

Thanks for joining us today, Amy. I really enjoyed the interview. For more information about Amy, visit her website at:

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Betty, as one of the Dames and a fan, I’ve been thrilled at the attention your books are receiving. And now the good news that two short stories are being made into movies! Can you tell us about that?

BETTY DRAVIS: Thanks, Christy, for your ongoing interest in my books and now my short-films. I’m glad you’re Betty Dravis in black hatasking about my short-films. I’m so excited… I have fulfilled every author’s dream in getting some of my works into film. I was delighted when Mina Ownlee, actor and founder of KPF Productions of Orlando, Florida, offered me a contract to do a short-film of The Snack, one of my three offerings in a horror anthology titled Six-Pack of Fear. As you know, the renowned paranormal author, Barbara Watkins, is my co-author on that book.

Word around the Net spreads fast and when several more production companies began inquiring about my other works, I was over the moon… The first offer fell apart when the producer was in a serious auto accident, but then I signed another contract with Suniil, In Transit Productions, actor and founder of Hollywood, California, who has won awards for his first two short-films. He is going to short-film my humorous adventure Uncle Herman’s Harem, which debuted in Best Short Stories of 2005.

And that’s not all: I also have offers for two feature films to be made from my longer works, but no contracts yet, so can’t go into detail on them… I’m keeping my fingers crossed and praying. I think you know that I’m a huge advocate of short-films, but a feature film has always been my big dream.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Do you have a release date for either one?betty dravis.the shack 2

BETTY DRAVIS: Your timing is perfect, Christy. Producer Ownlee just released the DVD of The Snack last week and it has already gone global with sales in New Zealand and Canada. That’s unusual because usually the premiere (or first screening) traditionally comes before the DVD. But a number of problems arose on the set during production, which caused such long delays that Mina and I agreed to put the DVD out as soon as possible. Our friendly fans were getting impatient to see how Mina adapted my story and what my unending hype was all about. I’m happy to report that the first week’s sales exceeded our expectations and we’re hoping work spreads fast…and far. Thanks to you, we will now reach even more people via your gracious and numerous Dames of Dialogues readers. We sincerely appreciate your interest.

As for my second short-film, Uncle Herman’s Harem, Producer Suniil Sadarangani is aiming for mid-to-late 2015. He’s busy putting together the package for his first “passion”: making a feature film of his current short-film In Transit. That was his first short and he achieved phenomenal results by having it nominated for a nomination to the Academy Awards last year. In Transit and his second short-film Blind both won awards. Suniil informed me he is tying my Uncle Herman’s Harem in with the coming In Transit packaging, which is good news for me.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Tell us about the actors who are playing roles in these films.

BETTY DRAVIS: I’m very pleased with the actors in The Snack; they all come from Florida since KPF studio is located there. The main lead is a newcomer to acting, Brian Mason, who plays the part of father Mike Kirby. I’ve shown betty dravis. the snackthis film to several Hollywood directors and all agree he handles his role with believable drama and “shows a lot of potential.” KPF founder, Mina Ownlee (stage name simply Mina) plays the role of mother Michelle Kirby. Mina has been acting since childhood in The Bronx and gives her usual stellar performance. Makaylee Rinaldo plays the important role of the child Cayla who is in danger from paranormal forces. Since her father is Kelly D. Weaver, a popular Florida film producer, and her mother, Amy Rinaldo, serves in numerous film capacities, Makaylee has many film credits. Next we come to the fourth main lead: Cindy Long plays the role of Morning Star and she’s an acclaimed actress with many credits from Disney to TV. Look for her in two big features coming in 2015: S.O.U.L. directed by the legendary Armand Mastroianni and Big Sky, coming soon to prime-time TV.

Then there is the cute teen-ager, Romanita Collazo, who plays the part of Roma Star. This is her very first acting job and she leaves a fine impression. In addition, cameo roles are played by Amy Rinaldo and Bonnie Cobb who play the detectives. I’m so impressed with all of them…

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: And ala Stephen King and Alfred Hitchcock, will you have a cameo role?

BETTY DRAVIS: Hahaha, Christy… I am such a ham, years ago I would have loved that, but due to my advanced age,betty dravis. the snack characters I might not even be able to make it to Florida for the premiere/screening. Mina is setting that up at the present time. However, I have arranged through a long-time producer friend for a premiere in Hollywood’s famous House of Blues. This is part of the Innovative of West Hollywood Film Festival. My producer friend is Martin DeLuca, the founder of WHFF. I won’t be attending that either, but I hope to have representatives at both events.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: You’re receiving attention from celebrities – several of whom you’ve interviewed here at Dames of Dialogue and in your books Dream Reachers I and II. You’ve developed friendships with many of these celebrities and I wonder if you’ve ever had a negative experience with one (no need to name names!).

BETTY DRAVIS: No serious negative experiences, but I can think of three minor issues. One interview subject disagreed with my co-author over interview rights and pulled her interview from the first book, then opted back in for the second Dream Reachers. Another woman that I interviewed presented a minor problem when she made my job take much longer than it should have; she called on the phone, wanting to change too much text while adding over 2,000 words to the space we had allotted her. The third thing I recall could have been a little more serious; one person mentioned by a Hollywood celebrity didn’t like what she had said about him, so I obliged him by taking it out. All three of us ended on an amicable note, so it worked out and we are still friends to this day.

bettydravis.snackcharctersCHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Will there be a third Dream Reachers?

BETTY DRAVIS: Due to the amount of work involved with each interview, sorting through photographs and all that’s involved in book production, I doubt it, Christy. My co-author Chase Von and I worked till three in the morning for four or five months putting those books together. It was a labor of love because we do love spotting potential talent before they become big household names. And we’re elated that so many of them have gone on to greater glory. To name a few: Kashy Keegan (#1 hit song in Hong Kong), Jenny McShane and Shawn Richardz (prime-time TV roles) and the great Joan Baker, famous Voice-Over coach who is taking New York by storm… Since we spot-lighted over seventy talents, there are many more who are doing even greater. Even though the books weren’t major hits, we’re happy that they inspired other talented people to pursue their dreams. I can’t believe the e-mails we received from grateful readers who reported being inspired by these books.

I might one day do a digital version of Dream Reachers, show-casing about eight or ten celebrities, both major and minor. That would be “doable”…

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: You also have a background as a journalist during which time you interviewed betty dravis booksfamous celebrities such as Clint Eastwood (lucky you!). What fun you must have had! Do you miss those days in the past when you were buzzing around Hollywood conducting these interviews?

BETTY DRAVIS: There is that mistaken impression that I flitted about Hollywood doing my interviews of the rich and famous. But that’s not how it worked. All my contacts were through my newspaper work. It’s common for newspapers to attract celebrities because publicity is the name of their game. The more good press the better… Thus whenever they’re on the road their publicists inform the media and we take it from there. That’s how I met super-star Jane Russell and interviewed her at a round-table session at Trader Vic’s in San Francisco. I was editor of The Gilroy (California) News Herald at the time. The same with country/western singer Tanya Tucker who was in the nearby town of San Martin to perform at Bobby McGee’s Night Club… She was staying at the ranch of a family friend and I got invited to be in their entourage for various activities over the week-end, including Tanya’s birthday party. And then there was SenatorTed Kennedy…

My all-time favorite interview was with the very handsome, talented living legend Clint Eastwood. I lucked out with him, meeting him through his college friend whom I had featured in a story when I was a feature writer/columnist for The East San Jose Sun. I’ll never forget the night I had a private interview with him in her home. He was so charming and complimentary of my writing skills, encouraging me to follow my dreams. I published those stories and three others in the book Dream Reachers that I wrote with celebrity interviewer/poet Chase Von and later in digital format in Star Struck: Interviews with Dirty Harry and Other Hollywood Icons.

Christy, as for wishing for days gone by, NO, I don’t. It was fun at the time, but I have never been one to dwell on the past. I couldn’t reach my dreams if I did that. I believe in living in the present, enjoying it while still pushing onward to fulfill our dreams and follow our passions into the future. There will be time enough to dream of the past when I am too old to work.

betty dravis.the hiss of evilCHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Let’s turn to your author life. You’re a prolific writer and have crossed several genres. What is your favorite genre to write and do you have a favorite book?

BETTY DRAVIS: I love writing scary stories with a bit of twisted humor, but have no idea why, Christy. I don’t actually have a favorite genre but I don’t like writing romance unless it’s a light comedy. I write whatever story seems dominant in my mind at the time. I can tell you this, though: I had the most fun writing a cross/genre young adult book The Toonies Invade Silicon Valley. I think it’s because I could let my imagination soar. I was elated when Apple’s famous Steve “Woz” Wozniak agreed to a cameo speaking role in the book.

I can tell you stories about each of my nine books, but that would take too long. My “heart” book is 1106 Grand Boulevard because it’s about my beautiful older sister and her seven marriages and is set around our childhood home in Hamilton, Ohio. It was hard writing about my family, but I felt it was a story that needed to be told.

As for favorite book, I do believe 1106 Grand Boulevard would have to be it (for above reasons). I have a great fondness for the Six-Pack books that I wrote with the popular paranormal writer Barbara Watkins: Six-Pack of Blood and Six-Pack of Fear. It was through the Fear book that about four producers took an interest in my works, but we discussed that in the opening of this article.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Do you have an upcoming release?

BETTY DRAVIS: Within the past month I released a short humorous/adventure story, The Search for Bobby McGee, through my publisher, Wendy Dingwall of Canterbury House. I’m still doing PR on that one while trying to launch The Snack DVD simultaneously. Even at that, the answer is YES, I have a new release coming. It’s my first full-length horror novel, titled The Hiss of Evil. Wendy was kind enough to loan me out to Janet Beasley of JLB Creatives Publishing for this one selection.

A generous friend created a cover that I’m just nuts about; one that Janet already approved. I will share it to your readers in this article for the very first public showing. I hope to hear your fans’ opinion on this cover. And so it goes. Being an author yourself, you know that we are always juggling projects. However, even though I dreamed of having movies made of my stories, I truthfully never thought I would be juggling books and movies simultaneously. I’m over the moon at the moment, and will probably be intolerable when I get that feature film out there.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: I’ve always found you very knowledgeable about promoting and, to be honest, you remind me of the Energizer Bunny when it comes to this. What do you like best about promoting? What do you like least?

BETTY DRAVIS: Well, the Bunny is now 86 years young, and losing some of that energy, but I will keep pushing. Onward and upward, I say… I really enjoy the writing, Christy, but don’t like the promoting. It takes too much time from my true passion of writing. That’s what I dislike about it, and what I like about it is that I get to meet many new and lovely friends. People like the Dames and my Facebook, Goodreads and Twitter friends.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: As an accomplished author, do you have any advice you can offer a novice or struggling writer?

BETTY DRAVIS: This advice might sound trite but the best advice I can give is to never give up and to remember there is no such thing as a writer. We are all re-writers; meaning write it as many times as it takes until you are confident it works. If this means getting a professional editor, then that’s a must. The American language is complicated, so make sure you have your text edited before sending it out into the world. Reviewers are critical and won’t hesitate to point out all your errors. They have long memories, so get it right the first time. Another very important point is creating your own “voice.” Don’t imitate other writers… It takes time before we “feel” our own voice; you may not find it until your second or even third book. But it will come… There is so much more, but there are many books on the subject of writing. Stephen King has a great one on the market.

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: Let’s get personal. What’s your most favorite pastime Favorite food? Favorite saying? Favorite place?

BETTY DRAVIS: My favorite pastime is writing, of course, and spending time with my lovely children and grandchildren. I even have three great-greats… I don’t really have a favorite food, but I like seafood, salads, Mexican food… and cornbread. My favorite saying is one my mother used to say: “I wouldn’t give a nickel for another child, but wouldn’t take a million for any one of mine.” Some of my favorite words are: flabbergasted, funky, kinky, lickety-split. As for my favorite place, it’s home. The old saying, “There’s no place like home,” is absolutely right. Nowadays I can’t make up my mind whether to choose my “Girl Cave” where I write and reflect or my bed…

CHRISTY TILLERY FRENCH: I guess we covered all the important points, Betty. It’s been fun and enlightening talking to you. Speaking for myself and all the Dames, we’re very happy for you. Congratulations on your two short-films and we look forward to a feature film in the future for you. In closing I’m going to share your various links so our readers know where to find your books, your biography and other things about you. TTYL (talk to you later), as they say in phone texts…

Betty’s The Snack DVD purchase link:!kpf-store/c3jc

Betty’s Amazon Central Author page:

Betty’s website:

Betty’s Facebook page:

The Snack: Movie page


by Christy Tillery French

Bobby McGee cover - Smashwords ready ... FinalI just finished reading Betty Dravis’s new digital book, a short story titled The Search for Bobby McGee. What a writer! I have always admired Betty’s prolific writing style and ability to write in any genre out there and this one is a definite winner.  I really love the unusual concept of this story and was surprised at the novel ending. It’s only been posted for two days, but I was not surprised to see it listed in Amazon ranking as #5 in Teens and Young Adults Short Reads; #46 in over-all literature. Way to go, Betty…

I also enjoyed reading the praises by other successful writers at the front of book, and the foreword, written by esteemed feature film director Russel Emanuel, was awesome. Betty Dravis certainly has friends in high places.

Since I’m also a fan of Janis Joplin and her biggest hit song, Me and Bobby McGee, I was curious about how this multi-genre author came up with the idea for this story. I was happy to find the answer in her author note in the book. This is what Betty says about writing The Search for Bobby McGee:

betty dravis

Author Betty Dravis

Did you ever have a song that keeps running through your mind for years after first hearing it? Well, it’s like that with Janis Joplin’s version of Me and Bobby McGee. I just can’t get that tune or the melancholy love story out of my mind.

I’ll never forget the passionate performance this legendary performer gave and I often watch it on this video. She moved me to tears…and still does.

Being human, we all day-dream from time to time, wondering if “the one that got away” was our soul mate or not. With that in mind, I often thought about Bobby and Janis, wondering if he was real and whether she spent her life pining for him. Could he be the reason she became a substance abuser? The reason she died so young?

When I learned that Kris Kristofferson and Fred Foster actually wrote the song and the Bobby in his song was female, then I knew Janis’s Bobby wasn’t real. But he was still real to me and I kept wondering about him. That’s what inspired this story, and I had hoped in writing it that it might exorcise him–and the song–from my mind.

It ain’t working, friends. I suppose, like Janis, I will never forget Bobby McGee.


 I hope all the Dames of Dialogue readers get your copy of this short story. A warm, humorous adventure awaits you…

To get your copy, go to this link:

colbymarshall-headshot1 (2)Confession right up front: I am a reader of paper books.

Don’t get me wrong…if you love e-readers because they help you read more often/easier/in a way that ensures no one on your subway commute can see the cover of your self-help book about how to overcome your intense fear of Slinkies, then have at it.  I just know that for me, printed books are my preference.  Maybe this is because I write my own books on the computer, so electronic books often automatically become “work” in my mind no matter the author or topic.  Maybe it’s because I resist change (I do.  I’m pretty much the only person under the age of thirty who still has an AOL e-mail address, and I will cling to my Blackberry until the day someone tries to steal it so fast and violently that they rip my whole hand off with it.).  But while those things might be true, I think the most likely reason I lean towards printed books is because they happen to be less dangerous.

Let me explain.

Books are not safe in my house.  If I was a book, I would be terrified to live here.  Why, you ask?  Because the mortality rate of books in my home is extremely high, and none of the causes of early demise for literature around here are particularly painless.  Methods of torture for books include being ripped apart by a toddler (who may or may not have inherited my penchant for thrillers, but that’s another post for another time), becoming the hairball-catcher for one of the not-so-naked cats (Yes, there is one naked one), and being buried under a pile of other, heavier books when our makeshift book shelves buckle and send our extensive collection raining to the floor.

But as bad as those fates may be, the worst of them—and the one that accounts for the highest percentage of book deaths in this house—is the very reason I steer clear of the e-reader: the bathtub drop.

I can’t count the number of books we’ve laid to rest due to a dip in the bath bubbles.  I’m a tub-reader (Definition: Person who reads in the bathtub, not a person who reads bathtubs).  I’m a perpetual workaholic, so the only time I let myself “off” long enough to squeeze in a respectable chunk of a book for fun is when I can rationalize it by pairing it with general human hygiene (sounds psychologically healthy, huh?).  This habit benefits my favorite authors immensely; any time a copy meets its watery doom, I shell out several dollars for two more—one to pick up reading where I left off, and another as a backup for when, inevitably, the first of the two new copies makes a splash all its own.  I’m pretty sure Katrina Kittle owes a substantial percentage of her sales of The Kindness of Strangers to my serious bathtub addiction.

ColorBlindCV1 (2)Which brings me back to why I’m still quite solidly in the books in print on paper camp and will likely remain there for the foreseeable future.  If I were to let my e-readers take “swims” as often as my paper books, I’d likely need another job to support my book habit. But this time, I wouldn’t be paying the author a second time for another copy of their book I loved so much—I’d be paying a big company for a new e-reader.  So, the idea of simply replacing the damaged merchandise is not only pricier in this situation, but it doesn’t appeal to my sensibilities as much, either.  After all, who would you be happier to give a few extra dollars to on a given day?  An author whose work has informed, helped, or entertained you, or to a stockholder whose name you don’t even know but who happens to hold a few shares of that e-reader company and has so many dollars in various stock statements that he won’t even notice when the investment you shelled out shows up in his statement numbers, because that amount you spent, while significant to you, didn’t even make a blip on his radar?

Besides…while I don’t think you can be electrocuted by making your e-reader your accidental rubber ducky, I’m just not keen on adding anything into water that contains me that happens to carry a charge of any kind.  If by some off-chance it so much as gave me a little zap, I’d probably need to buy a dozen self-help books about how to overcome extreme fear of bathtub shocks.  And given that I’d be too traumatized to ever buy another e-reader, everyone would be able to see those books’ covers on my subway commute.

 Writer by day, ballroom dancer and choreographer by night, Colby Marshall has a tendency to turn every hobby she has into a job, thus ensuring that she is a perpetual workaholic.  In addition to her 9,502 jobs, she is a proud member of International Thriller Writers and Sisters in Crime.  She is actively involved in local theatres as a choreographer and occasionally indulges her prima donna side by taking the stage as an actress.  She lives in Georgia with her family, two mutts, and a charming array of cats.

About COLOR BLIND: There is something unusual about Dr. Jenna Ramey’s brain, a rare perceptual quirk that punctuates her experiences with flashes of color. They are hard to explain: red can mean anger, or love, or strength. But she can use these spontaneous mental associations, understand and interpret them enough to help her read people and situations in ways others cannot. As an FBI forensic psychiatrist, she used it to profile and catch criminals. Years ago, she used it to save her own family from her charming, sociopathic mother.   Now, the FBI has detained a mass murderer and called for Jenna’s help. Upon interrogation she learns that, behind bars or not, he holds the power to harm more innocents—and is obsessed with gaining power over Jenna herself. He has a partner still on the loose. And Jenna’s unique mind, with its strange and subtle perceptions, may be all that can prevent a terrifying reality…

Color Blind is Now Available:

On Amazon:

On Barnes and Noble:

And other places books are sold!

To learn more about Colby and her books, check out her website at





Welcome to Dames of Dialogue, Denise! Tell us about your latest book.

My most recent release is Bright as Gold, fourth and final novel of The Georgia Gold Series. The series, which begins with Sautee Shadows in the time of the 1830s Georgia Gold Rush, connects the mountains and the coast as readers follow four fictional families through the mid-1800s. One of my main characters is Mahala Franklin, a half-Cherokee girl who grows up trying to find out who killed her father and stole the gold he mined from the Sautee Valley. Eventually, her white innkeeper grandmother brings her to town to raise her as a proper young lady. There she meets Carolyn Calhoun, an unwilling and shy socialite forced to choose a husband between two very different brothers, and Jack Randall, shipping entrepreneur from Savannah. When Jack buys a competing hotel and the two also fight their attraction to each other, sparks fly. The middle two novels include lots of adventure set during The Civil War, and the most recent one is Reconstruction-era. It’s a more introspective and relational look at how the characters overcome during a very difficult period of time.

When you’re writing, who’s in control, you or the characters?

I start the momentum with my research, timeline and plot plans, but the characters have been known to take over at times. I think we have to be deniseweimersensitive to what a certain character would or would not do. If it doesn’t feel true to their personality or development, we need to find a little flexibility.

Promotion is a big—and usually the most hated—part of being a writer. Can you share a little bit about how you promote?

I started local, doing signings at book stores, gift shops, festivals, book clubs, etc. I crafted a basic news release that could be altered for each. I also contacted clubs and groups in the region which might have interest in an author’s visit. I supported all that with online publicity. Recently my publisher and I have worked to get the word out past the hour-and-a-half radius where I can personally appear. I’ve joined Goodreads and Twitter as well as Facebook and am doing more guest blogging, author networking, requesting reviews, and conducting giveaways. I’m also planning a book signing tour to a wider area.

How long have you been writing?

I began writing at age 11. We don’t have to talk about how long ago that was, do we? I grew up visiting historic sites with my parents. My active imagination would wonder what type of people had lived in the homes or towns and what their lives might have been like. Eventually I bought spiral-bound notebooks and would whip those out and scribble down the stories from right there in the back seat as we traveled. I went straight to writing novels, of course, although I wouldn’t want anyone to read those now!

What are your thoughts on the standard writing advice, “write what you know”?

I love this advice. It’s great to apply to selecting the setting for our books, for starters. If we create a story set near where we live, we are more apt to accurately capture the local “feel:” the ins and outs of the way people think, their ethnicity and heritage, the hole-in-the-wall places they frequent, their lingo, their history; the sounds, sights and smells of nature there; the area’s secrets and idiosyncrasies. Research is far easier; we run less risk of either error or the expense of visiting our chosen locale. Marketing is far easier; we have a strong natural geographic starting base for events with an instant niche. I believe it’s also good to write what we know in terms of what we have experienced. If we’ve lived through something, there’s a reason. There’s wisdom in finding the meaning in that experience. We can relate it with authentic emotion that will pierce the consciousness of the reader and share life lessons that may encourage others.

How do you classify yourself as a writer? Fiction or non-fiction? Specific genre such as mystery, short story, paranormal or more general such as women’s fiction, Appalachian, etc.

The Georgia Gold Series is historical fiction or Southern literature (or could be dubbed historical romance). While I will probably write more in that genre in the future, I expect there will be some out-of-genre surprises.

Besides “writer,” what else are you; what is your “day job”?

Wife, mother of two daughters, and keeper of the home. Swim/taxi mom most specifically. I spend a lot of time commuting and sitting in car rider lines. But writing is what has allowed me to be flexible and available for my family. I really feel the flip side of writer is saleswoman. I’ve created a blog article on that shocking conversion as well.

Describe your writing process once you sit down to write—or the preliminaries.

I’m an organized type of person, so I like to do my research first. I put facts in the mental hopper and allow them to percolate. As plot ideas spring forth randomly over time, I overlay those on my timelines. Then I’m free to daydream and let the actual scenes come to me – the fun part! – grab a pen or my laptop, and start composing.

Were books an important part of your household when you were growing up?

In my childhood home, academics and literature were greatly appreciated. My parents encouraged me to read the classics and would read aloud to me from series like Little House on the Prairie and The Chronicles of Narnia. My parents provided great examples of how being well-read made you well-educated and able to interact on a variety of subjects.

Any teachers who influenced you…encouraged you or discouraged?

deniseweimer.brightasgoldWell, I had one who scared me, and sometimes that can be motivational. She was my 8th grade English teacher. We’d do these exercises in class where we had to fill in a blank that had to do with the correct form of a verb or part of speech. But she’d do it in rapid-fire succession. We’d try our best to count ahead to which question might hit us, but she liked to mix things up. Everyone in class would be trembling like they were about to be tied to the execution pole. Because if you got the answer wrong she’d explode with something like, “NO! You ding-dong! That’s a dangling modifier!” Or some such nonsense. This was before calling children in a classroom names was politically incorrect. And she had a startling repertoire of originally insulting but not quite cursing names. We won’t even talk about how hard it was to get an ‘A’ in there. But … when I had to recite the balcony scene from “Romeo & Juliet,” she looked quite entranced. And there was a calendar she kept with literary scenes on it. The last month in her class “The Lady of Shalott” graced the wall. Of course I had a fascination with that poem then because the GPTV “Anne of Green Gables” had just come out. I would stare at the romantic depiction of the lady in the boat and wish it was me, “drifting down to Camelot,” away from English class. At the end of the school year, I asked Mrs. S for that page. Her look of surprised pleasure almost cracked into a warm smile. I walked away with a firm command of sentence structure and a print that now hangs matted and framed in my Victorian-style guest bedroom.

Have you bought an e-reader? What is your overall impression of electronic publishing?

I do have a Kindle. I hear there are some people who are e-reader-only people and others who are print-only people. I’m sure this is true, but I have found for me (and probably others, too) there’s a place for both. I love to find free and discounted books for the Kindle and take it with me on trips for ease of packing. But for books I want to keep forever because I love them that much or a friend wrote them – or a situation like with my Georgia Gold novels where the covers are one-of-a-kind prints done by a regionally collected artist – I value the physical copy on my shelf.

How do your characters “come” to you? Are they based loosely or closely on people you know?

My characters often come to me in those “loosely constructed” or “unplugged” moments described in the question on writer’s block. But before that happens, I spend time pondering what sort of person I want to represent a certain group of people and how I want them to be shaped from beginning to end by the trials and circumstances of history or what’s going on in the story. Mostly they are their own people, but occasionally a real-life person will bear some influence. An example of this would be Maddy, the hotel cook in my Georgia Gold Series. She was my grandma who has since passed away, who cleaned immaculately and was a wonderful cook but was never satisfied with her own efforts.

Any good suggestions for overcoming writer’s block?

I just read some fascinating research having to do with brainstorming. Basically it stated that we use different parts of our brain at different times in the creative process. And that the best thing to do when you’re stuck is to “unplug” your brain for a while … just take a walk or do another task requiring less concentration. The ideas will start to flow. That’s why we have our best inspiration at odd moments. Check out my blog at for an upcoming article on this!

Why do you write?

I write because when God gives you a gifting and a desire in the same area, you don’t squander it. There are so many talented writers out there, and I have no claims or delusions of fame. But I do believe if you’re a writer, you know it, and God will also give you the story or the manuscript, whether it be meant to entertain, instruct or encourage.

Thank for joining us today, Denise. For more information about Denise:



Welcome to Dames of Dialogue, Laurie!  Tell us one strange and provocative tidbit from your life that nobody has heard before.

I used to be a stripper. Yes. That was my job title, although it didn’t involve taking off my clothes. I worked in graphic arts before I segued into writing. In the “old-fashioned” way of creating printing plates, negatives for each ink color had to be sandwiched together precisely on a light table, which were then covered with a thick paper mask, and windows cut so the text and images would show through to make the plate. Hence, I was a negative stripper—which meant I complained about my tips. Just kidding. The tips were really good. Especially the ones about not cutting myself with the razor blade or inhaling developer fumes.

Laughing…Tell us about your latest book.

InPlaying Charlie Cool, television producer Charlie Trager’s secret relationship with Adam Joshua Goldberg (Joshua, to Charlie) gets even more laurie boriscomplicated when the mayoral staffer comes out in a very public way, leaves his post, and starts divorcing his wife. All Joshua wants out of the deal is shared custody of his two children, but with politics and the stress of Charlie’s job involved, what begins as a simple, uncontested proceduregets ugly fast—and might end up being more pressure than the two men can bear.

The book continues the storyline begun in novella The Picture of Cool. It’s also the sequel to Don’t Tell Anyone, if you’re keeping score.This novel has pushed my envelope in several ways: it’s my first sequel, it’s the first story I’ve outlined, and my first full-length gay contemporary novel.

Sounds interesting, Laurie. You’re breaking into a hot genre and I know you’ll do well. Can you share a little bit about what you’re working on now or what’s coming next?

I’m working on a romantic suspense story and after that, I think Charlie has more to tell me. The Trager Family Secrets series may expand with a few companion novels and perhaps have a little crossover with characters from one of my other books. I’m not ruling anything out yet!

When you’re writing, who’s in control, you or the characters?

They are. At least for the first draft. The biggest problems I’ve had in writing have stemmed from defying their true natures and trying to push them into situations Author Me wants them to be in but they might not be ready or even suited for. Sometimes that’s because I don’t know them well enough yet. So I invite them in, let them get cozy, and listen.

Love that answer. What do you consider the single most satisfying aspect of being a writer?

Connecting with readers. I love that. It’s like completing the communication circle. I sit here alone and write a story, but it doesn’t feel complete until someone reads it and gets something from it: understanding a little better how another person lives, or at least some entertainment value. It’s especially gratifying to hear from readers who have connected with Drawing Breath, a story so close to my heart. I’ve heard from readers with loved ones living with cystic fibrosis, I’ve heard from relatives of the man upon whom I based the protagonist. It’s been quite humbling.

I agree. Interacting with readers is so gratifying. If you could talk for thirty minutes with any author (or person), living or dead, who would it be?

If I could get her to stop writing for thirty minutes, I’d want to talk to Joyce Carol Oates. She’s so prolific and deep and her stories are so gorgeously creepy and heartbreaking. I want to know how she does that. I want to know how she made me feel empathy for a serial killer.

What is your strongest and/or your weakest area in the creative process?

I love, love writing dialogue. I love how people in real life speak when they think no one else is listening, I love how they speak when they’re frustrated and the words can’t come fast enough and they’re sometimes the wrong ones. That’s one of my favorite and strongest areas of the creative process. What I’ve been working on over the last few years is my plotting and storytelling. I’ve been a proud, dedicated “pantser,” but I want to stretch and grow as a writer, so I wondered if some form of outlining could help me. I worried that working off too tight an outline would give me hives and completely bore me. But a looser, modified version called story beats, which author Lynne Cantwell shared with me, feels like a comfortable “halfway” step. I’ve used this process on my last two books and I really feel like it’s helped me focus on character motivation and storytelling.

How interesting. I’ll have to try that. What are your thoughts on the standard writing advice, “write what you know”?

How long do you have? I get a little passionate about this subject. I think it certainly helps to write about what has settled in your pores. But I don’t discount empathy and imagination for writing about things you’d like to explore and learn about. Or else how would we write science fiction? How would male authors write from a female point of view, and vice versa? Has J.K. Rowlings ever been a boy wizard?

Exactly. How do you classify yourself as a writer? Fiction or non-fiction?Specific genre such as mystery, short story, paranormal or more general such as women’s fiction, Appalachian, etc.

Oh, that’s hard. I write so many different genres. It’s all fiction—at least currently, because there’s a potential biography that’s been poking at me about one of my unsung baseball role models. One day when I can sit down and do all the research that will be required. Since I write so many different types of fiction—women’s fiction, contemporary, romance, romantic comedy, short stories—I’d boil it down to “realistic-style fiction about realistic characters going through sometimes trying situations with pathos and humor, often with an underlying romantic thread.” Yeah. There’s an Amazon category just waiting for me.

I like that. Describe your writing process once you sit down to write—or the preliminaries.

First I light a candle and sacrifice a goat… oh, wait. Wrong interview. Coffee is usually involved. I sit down and do a little deep breathing to clear my head. Then I just start typing. I’m working on a few different projects at any one time, and I think that flexibility helps me to drop pretty quickly into a project I’ve been away from for a bit. It’s like a muscle you need to keep fit, like any of the others.

Have you bought an e-reader? What is your overall impression of electronic publishing?

I was given one as a gift a few years ago and I love it. Electronic publishing has brought reading into the lives of many people who had otherwise given it a pass. Although there is nothing like a printed book—I love the feel of them and that smell of ink and paper—e-books are not only here to stay but growing in popularity.

It appears ebooks are the future. I know I love my Kindle. Any good suggestions for overcoming writer’s block?

For me, there is no writer’s block. Other forces are often afoot. When the words don’t come, it’s usually because I’m tired or overwhelmedand try to compensate by thinking too hard. Maybe that’s true for other writers; I don’t know. I’ll take a small break and get some fresh air or go swimming. My favorite advertising professor used to tell me that creative blocks dissolve in water. If we were stuck on something, he’d tell us to go fill our heads with information and then take a bath. But for me, the pool works just as well.

I’ll have to try that. Thanks for joining us today, Laurie, for a fun, interesting interview. For more information about Laurie:


Welcome to Dames of Dialogue, Alberta. What inspires you to write and who are your favorite characters? What is your writing schedule?

I am inspired to write because I love the development of creating and capturing characters and storylines that others can relate to. I am also genuinely inspired by everyday people, their lives and their stories. I wanted to create a platform to share stories that are real and relevant and to stir up people to move forward in life and pursue their dreams.

When did you decide you wanted to write?

During the winter of 1996 I decided I wanted to write a book, but I didn’t actually begin writing it until about five years later. In 1996 my oldest alberta lampkinssister, Agnes passed away, leaving her three year old daughter behind. I thought, my niece will never know her mother’s story – and I wanted to write about not only my sister’s life, but my father who passed and my aunt. Their lives mattered and I wanted to share their stories in a creative format.

Where do you get your inspiration for your stories?

I like to write about very real issues, those that can or have affected everyone at one time or another. I am inspired by what I see happening to others and in many cases what I have experienced personally. In Teach Me How To Fly, I based Jocelyn’s character on parts of my own life and I patterned Angel’s character after a mixture of cases I worked as an Adult Services and Child Protective Service worker.

What made you decide to write a story like Teach Me How To Fly?

I decided to write about faith, friendship and forgiveness with ordinary people because, unfortunately, too many people hold on to things that happened to them in the past and allow those things to hinder them from being happy and moving forward in life. I realize that there are some really great people in this world, but many of those people are consumed with regrets, mistakes and hurt and are unable to see the best in life. The characters are a compilation of many people I know of, but there situations may not be identical to those of some of my characters.

In Teach Me How To Fly, you wrote about domestic violence, is that an issue you feel needs to be addressed in the black and other communities?

Yes, I do feel that domestic violence is not discussed as much as it should be. Especially, since so many women are experiencing it. I think it is very easy for any of us to overlook what is actually going on if we are not in that sort of situation ourselves. But what we really need to do is become more aware and figure out what we can do to help those who are victims.

Why did you choose to self-publish your first novel? What was that experience?

Well, I asked God to teach me how to fly and I set out to learn everything I could about the publishing business. Once I learned how to design a book cover, how to set up files for print and eBook publication and how to market my book, I decided to not only self publish my book, but start my own publishing company, A.L. Savvy Publications. I completed a book project titled, Messages to Our Children, where I enlisted twenty-two others along with myself to write encouraging messages and thoughts to our children. The purpose of that project was to come together as one to help uplift and encourage our children and all children to move towards success in life. I believe we must be the example for the young people following in our footsteps. It was an amazing project – everyday people coming together for a super great purpose. It was thrilled to self publish such a positive body of work. Self-publishing involved a lot of time and a lot of hard work, but it was very well worth it. I look forward to seeing where this venture takes me.

What authors do you admire?

There are, but to name a few, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Pearl Cleage, Kimberla Lawson Roby, Terry McMillan, Victoria Christopher Murray, Danielle Steel, Walter Mosley, etc.

Any favorite books?

As a young reader, I would say one of my favorite books was A Sidewalk Story by Sharon Bell Mathis – she told a great story of a young girl who tries to save her best friend’s things from getting wet after the family was evicted from their apartment – it was heart touching and I was able to relate to how much that girl cared about her friend. As an adult reader, I have to say, I Wish I Had a Red Dress by Pearl Cleage is one of my most favorites – in the story the main character is an advocate for young girls and tries to help the young ladies overcome everyday experiences in life. As an advocate for adults and children, I truly enjoyed the human service aspect of the story – it is a great read.

Teach_Me_How_To_Fly_PromotionDid one of them inspire you?

Most certainly, it was Langston Hughes – I believe he was far beyond his years; he was a dreamer and saw a better tomorrow. That is what life is about, seeing a better tomorrow.

Is writing your only passion?

Right now, it is one of my primary passions, but there are also other areas of interest I plan to pursue in the future. Like, building A.L. Savvy Publications and helping to discover amazing new writers.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I would like to continue to work on mini book projects, such as Messages to Our Children and other collective works. I would like to see A.L. Savvy Publication as one of the foremost independent publishing companies in the industry. I’d also like to see my novel Teach Me How To Fly produced as a national stage play and as a movie.

What advice would you give aspiring authors?

Please write at least something every single day. Even if it is only a page or two in your journal or manuscript, make a habit of doing it daily. Also, follow your heart and write the book you would want to read.

What would you like readers to learn from your stories?

That their life is an amazing journey and that they are not alone in dealing with their particular circumstance in life and that obstacles can always be overcome. And that even when we are not able to overcome them completely, we can find a way to live with or deal with them and then move forward in our lives. If we have faith and begin making the right choices, we can still find peace and joy at the end of every road.

What upcoming projects are you working on?

I am working on publishing a book written by my husband, who is a Command Sergeant Major in the Army. He wrote a story about his experience as a leader in war. The book is titled, Suicide in the Mountains of Afghanistan. We are looking towards an October 2014 release date. Additionally, I am working on a book project titled, Mixed Bag: A Cultural Journey around the World – it will feature people of diverse cultures who are now living in America and a book project with teen and young adult expressions titled, Our Voices Matter: Through the Eyes of A Young Adult.

Where can people purchase your books? Do you have a website?

All of the books are and will be available on,, Kindle, Kobo, Nook and Apple iBooks. My web site address is

Alberta’s bio follows. Thanks for joining us today, Alberta!


Alberta is a proud Army wife and has been married to her husband Command Sergeant Major Al Lampkins for over twenty-five years. She is the founder of A.L. Savvy Publications and has been working toward publication for over five years while working as an Adult Services and Child Protective Services Social Worker. In addition, she completed her Master of Arts Degree in Sociology from Fayetteville State University in 2012. Her graduate research project on HIV testing among African American women has been accepted for scholarly publication in the Journal of Research on Women and Gender, Texas State University. All roads have led Alberta to following her dream of writing and publishing her first novel.

Alberta is the Project Coordinator for the book Messages to Our Children and the author of her debut novel, Teach Me How to Fly. She is also the Project Coordinator of the book, Mixed Bag: A Cultural Journey Around the World, which will be released the fall of 2014 by A.L. Savvy Publications.

Alberta founded A.L. Savvy Publications, an independent publishing company, after realizing how much she enjoyed listening and reading stories about everyday people. She wanted to create a platform for others to share their stories in print.

Alberta is a native of Buffalo, New York, however, currently resides in Tennessee with her husband and their son.

Visit Alberta at: or on the web



The Dames would like to welcome author Nicola Furlong to the blog today. Tell us about your latest book, Nicola.

My latest novel HEARTSONG, is the debut in my new contemporary women’s fiction series the Sisterhood of Shepherds.

Some families have hope. Others have faith. The Shepherds of rural Oregon have Faith, Hope and Charly, three quirky sisters whose lives change forever when they reluctantly answer a personal calling to help others make amends.

In HEARTSONG, thirty-something single parent Charly Shepherd is satisfied with her life raising two children and thousands of plants in her family-owned Sweet Shepherd Nursery. Then, tragedy strikes. As she and her siblings struggle nicolafurlongto keep the nursery going, Charly begins to believe her family’s destiny is greater than raising flowers. When the three sisters reluctantly delve into family secrets to help their ailing father fulfil a promise, their lives change forever as they pursue a new inspirational path of discovery, heartache, humor and redemption.

Tagline: Experience friendship, family and forgiveness – Join the Sisterhood of Shepherds.

What great names and what a great idea for a series. Can you share a little bit about what you’re working on now or what’s coming next?

I’m writing the first draft of HOMEFIRES, the next novel in the Sisterhood of Shepherds series. It’s Halloween in rural Oregon and Faith, Hope and Charly Shepherd delve further into their personal calling to help others atone for past misdeeds. The family’s Sweet Shepherd Nursery is also hosting a ‘haunted greenhouse’ event, so everyone is tooling up their ‘thriller zombie’ moves.

Love it! What is a typical writing day like for you?

Wish I could say my life orbits around writing, but it really spins on food, especially chocolate. A typical day depends on the season.

The routine in spring and summer is easy: up early for breakie and in the garden for an hour, write new stuff from 8:30 to noonish, eat, exercise for an hour (bike ride or Nordic pole walking) while pondering my next scene, then take the dogs for a walk, back to being slumped over the computer for an hour or so of marketing and promotion before dinner and then more fun with family, friends or the plants. Fall and winter writing schedule is similar, but revolves around my playing Old-Timer’s hockey three mornings a week and not so much in the gardens.

Sounds like you lead an active life! Dogs and gardening – two of my favorites. Promotion is a big—and usually the most hated—part of being a writer. Can you share a little bit about how you promote?

Oh, I really despise promotion, but I shamelessly plug away. I have a blossoming website/blog, dig in and out of Facebook and GoodReads, and am now sprouting on Pinterest, as it really suits my gardening photos. I also teach writing and self-publishing, am an active public speaker, and attend some writing events.

nicolafurlong.teedoffTell us a little bit about where you live.

I’m really lucky to live and garden in a small seaside town on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. We boast the best climate in Canada and my gardens are chock a block with plants and blossoms. I’m currently haunted by striking bamboos, Himalayan blue poppies and fairy and vertical gardens.

Sounds beautiful. Where do you find inspiration for your writing?

The Sisterhood of Shepherds bloomed when I decided to dodge out of the mystery genre and plant myself in contemporary fiction. I realized I wanted to write something heart-warming rather than heart-breaking, and two themes naturally occurred to me: family and gardening.

I have five sisters and two brothers and felt it was time to explore the joys, trials and noise of family life. I am also passionate about digging in the dirt and drawn to all the thematic ideas, like life, death and seasons, surrounding gardening. So, putting my family of Shepherds into the plant nursery business seemed an ideal fit.

Love that answer. If you could talk for thirty minutes with any author (or person), living or dead, who would it be?

I would cherish the opportunity to meet Harper Lee. To Kill a Mockingbird is a wonderful novel, focused on family, truth and hope. As a tomboy with an older brother, I identify directly with Scout and her challenges to please her family, her society and yet be herself. I understand that the author had many challenges, some personal, some writing and some societal, in creating the final version. Her perseverance is inspiring.

That’s absolutely my favorite book. Although I understand she’s a bit reclusive, it would be a great coup to talk to her. What are your thoughts on the standard writing advice, “write what you know”?

This is an appealing question because I’ve recently completely changed my attitude towards this old chestnut. When I was writing mystery and suspense novels, I thought one should write about what interests you, what you don’t know but would like to explore. With this in mind, I dug into many things, including forensics, professional golf, opera singing and being a stigmatic. Now, with the Sisterhood of Shepherd series, I’m using what I know about sibling rows and reconciliations to grow a new fictional family.

What is your VERB? (This is a big poster at a local mall)? If you had to choose ONE verb that describes you and you behavior or attitude, what would it be?

GAME. Suits me to a tee as I’m very athletic and willing to tackle almost anything (and sometimes anyone!).nicolafurlong.heartsong

Were books an important part of your household when you were growing up?

Yes, books and reading played huge roles. Both my parents were highly educated and voracious readers. We all read from an early age and several of my siblings have had books and articles published. My father devoured murder mysteries and introduced me to some terrific writers, like Carter Dickson, Rex Stout, Margery Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, Ellery Queen and Raymond Chandler, not to mention the greats like Christie, Conan Doyle and Collins.

Have you bought an e-reader? What is your overall impression of electronic publishing?

I’m into electronic publishing big time. In 2008, when I learned that Japanese readers had downloaded millions of books to their cell phone screens, I realized I could self-publish my backlist and find a new audience. It was a tremendous challenge and a steep-learning curve but within a year, I had several ebooks available for sale online, awake and alive in the world again, rather than snoozing in drawers or on disks. I now regularly teach electronic publishing at a local college and have had many students succeed in publishing their own work and beginning to manage their career as writers. How cool is that?

I think it’s wonderful. Ebooks are definitely the way to go. Any good suggestions for overcoming writer’s block?

Write something, anything, everyday. Don’t edit, don’t second guess, and don’t stop.

Thanks again for joining us today, Nicola. For more information, visit:

HEARTSONG is available in paperback and ebook at:


Barnes and Noble:

TEED OFF! is in trade paperback and ebook available at:


Barnes & Noble: 1112560059?ean=9781610091091

Laurel-Rain Snow

Laurel-Rain Snow


My journey as one of the Dames of Dialogue has been more than four years long, and rich in interesting interactions with other authors.

Parting ways does not really mean goodbye, as I’ll be popping in from time to time, to see what the other Dames are doing, and contributing my two-cents worth in comments.

During the time I have spent here, I have also kept myself busy blogging, which has turned into something of an obsession, with numbers reaching twenty sites at one point, but now down to eleven.

In 2010, I participated in National Novel Writing Month and reached the goal of the challenge with 52,000 words toward a now completed manuscript, Interior Designs.  It continues the story begun in Embrace the Whirlwind, but focuses on one of the supporting characters from that novel.



Interior Designs
Meet Martha Scott Cummings:   an interior designer, an abandoned wife, and a newly single mother to her daughter Meadow.   Now she must begin an interior journey to reexamine the life she had, the choices she made, and to find the strength to begin again.

The manuscript has been through the usual edits, as well as Beta reads.  Now I have to arrange for formatting, book cover design, and publication.  Sometime this next year, I hope!

At the same time, I’ve also completed another manuscript I have called Defining Moments.  A story that follows one middle-aged woman through the new life she is forging after her husband’s betrayal.  And his betrayal is not the usual kind.  Not another woman, but a financial skirmish that leaves her reeling.


Defining Moments
What moments in our lives define us? Do our choices determine our future?   When unexpected events derail her life, Jillian McAvoy realizes that she now has an opportunity to carve out a whole new beginning.   But something happens to her along the way that threatens everything she hoped and dreamed about.   How can the obsessions and compulsions that seemingly take over her life lead to her newly redesigned world?


This story has also been through its edits, readers, etc., as well.  I have enjoyed my journeys with these characters and will definitely share my progress when they are out there in the world.

My five published novels are available on Amazon, with the latest one, Web of Tyranny, on Kindle, available there as well.

Here’s a blurb about Web of Tyranny:


Web of Tyranny by Laurel-Rain Snow is a proud, if poignant tale of Margaret Elaine Graham, a woman entangled in the trenches that epitomized her abusive childhood home only to flee into a stultifying marriage with Bob Williams. Seduced by the hope of achieving her goal of a college education and a life free from domination, she is blinded to Bob’s true qualities—and in a very real sense jumps from the pan into the fire. Oppression begets oppression and as Meg walks a thin line of human betrayal, she learns to stake her own claim to happiness—no matter how high the cost. Her fight leads to politicking during the radical antiwar movement of the 60s and 70s, which manifests as a near-compulsion, which will turn her world on end. Enticed by the possibilities open to her and chafing at the strictures of the marital ties, Meg bolts from the marriage with her toddler son in tow where a whole myriad of troubles await her.



To find out more about each of my books, check out my website at

Other Links:

Author’s Amazon Page

Author’s Blogs

Laurel-Rain Snow on Facebook



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